TEACHING

PROFESSOR HOLLANDER TEACHES CLASSES IN...

URBAN AND
REGIONAL
PLANNING

PLANNING
HISTORY AND
THEORY

QUALITATIVE
ANALYSIS
 

FOUNDATIONS
of Public Policy and Planning
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning. Tufts University Fall 2007, Fall 2010, Fall 2014

Required core course for M.A. students. A conceptual and critical overview of public policy and planning theory, process, and practice. Provides an introduction to basic elements of public policy formation and application involving a range of environmental, social policy, and planning issues. This includes methods for analyzing policy and planning decisions, strategies for developing alternatives, examination of the role of values and empirical knowledge in setting policy agendas, and implementation.

Regional Planning Tools and Techniques – Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning. Tufts University, Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014.

As professionals addressing the most pressing urban, social, and environmental problems in society, planners and policy analysts are often faced with a paradox of scale: “local” is too narrow, “global” is too broad, and “national” is politically challenging. It is at the regional scale that some of the most innovative, exciting, and effective planning and public policy occurs. In this course, we explore the tools and techniques used in the professions of planning and public policy to address a wide range of issues where regionalism works: land use and development, transportation, energy, waste, and natural resources. Drawing on the state-of-the-art from practice, this course will help students to develop the knowledge and skills to be effective in their chosen planning and public policy careers.

QUALITATIVE SKILLS
for Planning and Public Policy
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning. Tufts University Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Fall 2013

Course introduces students to a suite of practical skills for planning and public policy, including field research, photography, focus groups, interviewing, content analysis, and case studies.

Through hands-on course sessions and projects, students will learn to match a topic of inquiry with an appropriate method. After studying each skill set, students will have the opportunity to practice their new skills in real world environments through community-oriented projects.

CITIES IN SPACE,
Place, and Time —
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning. Tufts University Fall 2008

Required core course for MA students. Introduces students to the history and theory of cities and metropolitan regions focusing specifically on the actions of planners and policy-makers and how these actions shape our communities, neighborhoods, cities, regions, and world. The focus will be on the US, but the course will include comparisons to other systems (e.g., UK, Western Europe, Latin America, and China).

The course will examine the urban and metropolitan fabric through the lens of work, family, transport and communications, energy, environmental conditions, physical structure, economics and trade. Race, class, gender, immigration, and culture change will serve as cross-cutting themes throughout the readings, lectures, and discussions. Particular attention will be paid to institutional actors and their responses – governments, business leaders, and community leaders.

FIELD PROJECTS:
Planning and Practice
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning. Tufts University Spring 2007,    Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2014

Required core course for students in M.A. program. Practical planning and research experience in a community or governmental setting.

Students are exposed to the realities of urban and environmental planning practice by working in teams for actual clients. Focuses on the interplay of expertise, social and political values, and professional relationships.

PHYSICAL
Planning and Design
Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning. Tufts University Spring 2007

Introduces students to the fundamental ideas and tools in the work of planning and designing the built environment, which includes the roads, structures, landscaping, and all urbanized spaces in between. Explores how and why people have planned and designed the built environment from the early Greeks to the New Urbanists. In a studio format, students will first develop skills in basic graphic presentation through paper and pen exercises. Next, the class will move to the digital design realm and experiment with planning and designing through the use of computer-aided design (Sketch-Up), Second Life, and geographic information systems (ArcGIS). You can visit the class' Second Life site by going to www.secondlife.com, creating an Avatar and visiting the Island "UEPP Tufts.”

HISTORY
of Planning Thought
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and
Public Policy, Rutgers University New
Brunswick, New Jersey, Fall 2005

Major ideas in city and regional planning. Utopian thought, European models of city planning, urban technology, the city beautiful movement, garden cities, housing reform, zoning, regional planning, theories of urban design, and national planning.

Focus on the origin, growth, and impact of these ideas on the evolution of planning and urban development in the context of broader intellectual, social, and technological changes.

RESEARCH METHODS
in Urban Studies
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and
Public Policy, Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey, Fall 2004 (Teaching Assistant)

Scientific method of study, the processes of conceptualization and measurement, and "experimental design," or how social programs are structured so they may be effectively studied.

INTRODUCTION
to Urban Housing
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and
Public Policy, Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey, Fall 2003 (Teaching Assistant)

Urban housing and development policy as it has evolved historically and as it is being practiced currently on the federal, state, and local levels. Basic economic factors affecting urban housing, political context, and social outcomes.

COMPUTER
Applications in Resource Management
Department of Landscape Architectural and Regional Planning, University of Massachusetts Spring 1999 and Spring 2000

An introduction to basic computing applications important in the management and operation of resource management and service firms. The major course topics include introduction to the operation system and file management of the Macintosh operating system and the Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel software programs.